Art, Design and Digital

Posted by Sue Jarman on 31 May 2017


As someone who can’t leave a bookshop without making a purchase - I was impressed that I managed to leave the recent David Hockney exhibition with just two postcards!

Probably more to do with the fact that the books (apart from one) didn’t come close to what I’d seen in the flesh – the exception, the ‘David Hockney: A Bigger Book’, although wonderful, was a bit over my budget, at £1,750.

I’m always drawn to great draughtsmanship, and artists’ sketchbooks – understanding where ideas start, seeing inside artists’ minds, getting an insight into thinking and working processes – following visual journeys’.

I love Hockney’s drawings - his observations, and ways of understanding people and places in pen and ink, pencil, graphite, crayons… from the late 1960s and 1970s. Then his series of 25 charcoal drawings, celebrating the arrival of spring 2013, in Yorkshire - a wall of dappled light, patterns, marks and atmosphere - it was like a large charcoal storyboard of woodland observations, just brilliant!

The four seasons room of videos. Being surrounded by four sets of screens recording the same views, offset and timed slightly differently - - calming, memorising and immersive.

And finally, the digital paintings – these were recorded as he worked, and were playing simultaneously around the walls. This differentiation in presentation brought them to life and prompted audience conversation and participation within the space. It was great to hear the audience discussing and sharing thoughts, opinions and observations.

And beyond the digital - a great insight into Hockeney’s painting process in general, images evolving and appearing before your eyes. The stylus could, so easily, have been a brush loaded with paint or ink.



Whatever your craft or practice, embracing digital technologies is really important. Digital may be part of your working process, be part of how you present or promote yourself, or literally the environment in which you resist. Even very traditional practices benefit from, for example, online time-lapse storytelling - being digitally aware, at the very least, is a necessity today!

With branding, and website design - ‘digital first’ and ‘mobile first’ are key considerations, with our first experience of something often being online, using a phone, tablet, computer, watching a video...

Your brand needs to be memorable online, your website needs to grab attention, across all devices! Expectations are high, windows of opportunity small, being measured in seconds, not minutes! Many companies are rebranding, or at least tweaking their presence to accommodate this.

Recently there’s been a trend for simplicity, clean lines, solid shapes, definitely driven by online and digital - Audi have updated their logo to be more in line with this.

I find myself checking on who’s embraced responsive web design, or more importantly who’s not, who successfully presents themselves in an innovate, classy or fun way; including smooth transitions, on an easy to navigate site, that loads fast!

But as we know the design pendulum is always swinging - and traditional illustration styles are back in demand, high-end book publishing is in vogue, traditional photographic techniques are enjoying a resurgence within fine art...

At the end of the day though, I’m a firm believer that the creative process should always involve putting pencil (or pen) to paper at some point, however high tech your techniques and processes are, especially at the start of something new.

Innovative and strong outcomes are born from creative thinking, constructive play and visual exploration – it’s tempting to jump in and rely on certain tools, and tried and tested working methods. It’s been proven, that not putting the same creative heads together for every project drives fresh ideas, inspires lateral approaches, avoids predictable/safe outcomes – it’s good to not get too comfortable with our creative working environment.

We are designing in interesting times!

Archive

Art, Design and Digital

Posted by Sue Jarman on 31 May 2017


As someone who can’t leave a bookshop without making a purchase - I was impressed that I managed to leave the recent David Hockney exhibition with just two postcards!

Probably more to do with the fact that the books (apart from one) didn’t come close to what I’d seen in the flesh – the exception, the ‘David Hockney: A Bigger Book’, although wonderful, was a bit over my budget, at £1,750.

I’m always drawn to great draughtsmanship, and artists’ sketchbooks – understanding where ideas start, seeing inside artists’ minds, getting an insight into thinking and working processes – following visual journeys’.

I love Hockney’s drawings - his observations, and ways of understanding people and places in pen and ink, pencil, graphite, crayons… from the late 1960s and 1970s. Then his series of 25 charcoal drawings, celebrating the arrival of spring 2013, in Yorkshire - a wall of dappled light, patterns, marks and atmosphere - it was like a large charcoal storyboard of woodland observations, just brilliant!

The four seasons room of videos. Being surrounded by four sets of screens recording the same views, offset and timed slightly differently - - calming, memorising and immersive.

And finally, the digital paintings – these were recorded as he worked, and were playing simultaneously around the walls. This differentiation in presentation brought them to life and prompted audience conversation and participation within the space. It was great to hear the audience discussing and sharing thoughts, opinions and observations.

And beyond the digital - a great insight into Hockeney’s painting process in general, images evolving and appearing before your eyes. The stylus could, so easily, have been a brush loaded with paint or ink.



Whatever your craft or practice, embracing digital technologies is really important. Digital may be part of your working process, be part of how you present or promote yourself, or literally the environment in which you resist. Even very traditional practices benefit from, for example, online time-lapse storytelling - being digitally aware, at the very least, is a necessity today!

With branding, and website design - ‘digital first’ and ‘mobile first’ are key considerations, with our first experience of something often being online, using a phone, tablet, computer, watching a video...

Your brand needs to be memorable online, your website needs to grab attention, across all devices! Expectations are high, windows of opportunity small, being measured in seconds, not minutes! Many companies are rebranding, or at least tweaking their presence to accommodate this.

Recently there’s been a trend for simplicity, clean lines, solid shapes, definitely driven by online and digital - Audi have updated their logo to be more in line with this.

I find myself checking on who’s embraced responsive web design, or more importantly who’s not, who successfully presents themselves in an innovate, classy or fun way; including smooth transitions, on an easy to navigate site, that loads fast!

But as we know the design pendulum is always swinging - and traditional illustration styles are back in demand, high-end book publishing is in vogue, traditional photographic techniques are enjoying a resurgence within fine art...

At the end of the day though, I’m a firm believer that the creative process should always involve putting pencil (or pen) to paper at some point, however high tech your techniques and processes are, especially at the start of something new.

Innovative and strong outcomes are born from creative thinking, constructive play and visual exploration – it’s tempting to jump in and rely on certain tools, and tried and tested working methods. It’s been proven, that not putting the same creative heads together for every project drives fresh ideas, inspires lateral approaches, avoids predictable/safe outcomes – it’s good to not get too comfortable with our creative working environment.

We are designing in interesting times!

Archive